Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of what it means to be human in the broadest sense, through an examination of culture and society (sociocultural and linguistic anthropology), the biology and evolution of humans and our closest relatives (biological anthropology), and the study of past human communities and material culture (archaeology).  Students in this major develop an appreciation of the value of physical and cultural differences at the local, national, and global levels, and learn critical thinking skills that support them in careers that involve working with individuals of diverse national or ethnic backgrounds.

The curriculum is ideal for students who want to pursue professional careers or graduate study in anthropology and archaeology. However, students will also find the curriculum fully suitable to prepare them for employment opportunities or careers in:  secondary or higher education; medicine; law; museum and foundation settings; the local, state and federal government (such as the National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, National Institute of Health and others); non-governmental organizations and non-profit organizations; foreign service with government agencies (such as the Agency for International Development, United Nations organizations and others); private archaeological research institutions; and nontraditional opportunities emerging in business and management.

Students majoring in anthropology may earn either the Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Bachelor of Science (BS) degree. The BA option in anthropology is available in two tracks: general anthropology track and archaeology track. Students pursuing the general anthropology track receive foundations in the archaeology, biological anthropology and cultural anthropology subfields of anthropology as well as options to pursue upper-level courses in each of the subfields. Students who elect to pursue the archaeology track take the foundation courses but also have the opportunity to take multiple upper-level courses which focus on specific topics in archaeology. In addition, majors receive a broad yet rigorous liberal arts education.

What do you want to do with Anthropology?

Career ideas for Anthropology majors

Archeologist, Archivist, Biological or Physical Anthropologist, Cultural Anthropologist, Curator, Forensic Anthropologist, Human Resource Manager/Specialist, Lawyer, Linguistic Anthropologist, Marketing Specialist, Social Worker, Survey Researcher, Teacher, and more

Remember: Your major does not equal your career! For more ideas about how to put your education to work, talk with your specific Career Advisor.

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